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Happy Dirt Rich New Year!

2018 is a fresh start for many people to concentrate on their New Year’s Resolutions and these an involve healthy eating, losing weight, exercise and improving finances. All of these are important personal resolutions that help us get off to a great start in the New Year. Here are two additional resolutions that can help us all…Recycle and Re-Purpose….just a thought to start your year….

Recycle – Reducing the amount of waste that goes in our Landfills is a great goal. Landfills have trash that takes a very long time to decompose. For example, here are items with their estimated shelf life in a landfill:
Plastic Water Bottles – 450 years
Disposable Diapers – 550 years
Plastic 6-Pack Collar – 450 years
Extruded Polystyrene Foam – over 5,000 years
Foam Coffee Cup – 50 years
Aluminum Cans – 200 to 500 years

Here is a great article to read on items you can recycle to help you get started: http://www.wm.com/thinkgreen/what-can-i-recycle.jsp

I found this great poster below that easy to print off and show your kids to encourage their recycling from this site https://justforkidsdental.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/recycle.png


Re-purpose – Help the future generations by re-using or modifying items that commonly go in landfills. Examples can be found all over Pinterest. Get started here: https://www.pinterest.com/leighfunderburk/products-i-love/

Items that are commonly used in re-purpose projects:

(all types of furniture, art projects, outdoor projects)
2 Liter Plastic Bottles
(vertical planters for fences, greenhouses)
Shipping Containers
(sustainable housing or workshop)
Food Safe Barrels
(potato grow beds, rainwater capture)
Old Windows
(art work, bulletin boards, picture frames)
Gallon Milk Jugs
(planters, water storage, watering plants/trees)
Plastic Grocery Bags and Bread Bags
(non-food storage, small trash can liners)

Check out our video on food safe barrels being used for growing potatoes.

Great article on how to build a vertical garden out of soda bottles: http://www.dietoflife.com/do-not-throw-your-soda-bottles-make-a-vertical-garden-with-them/

I hope your New Year is great and that you are able to add Recycling and Re-Purposing to your New Year’s Resolutions!

Check out our Book for more sustainable ideas in the New Year:  Dirt Rich

Sustainable Christmas

More Meaning and Joy – Less Stress and “Stuff”

While growing up in Humboldt, TN on a small farm we rented from Aunt Joyce and Uncle Brance, Christmas had so much joy and meaning. We didn’t have a lot of money, but we always had food on the table and tons of love. My Mom was the oldest of 11 children, so there were always lots of cousins to enjoy at Holiday gatherings. On Christmas day we visited my grandparents home place with all the aunts, uncles and cousins and received thoughtful gifts…some of them, I still have. Aunt Elaine made me a cross stitched pin cushion, because she knew I liked to sew and I still use that same pin cushion today.

After I graduated from college in 1982, holidays were much more materialistic. I wanted so much “stuff” and the more I bought, the more I “needed”. Then family wants came into play and the cycle continued for years. One day in my forties a lightbulb when on in my head and the realization hit – all that “stuff” was temporary and didn’t have a lot of meaning. The latest gadgets were discarded after 6 months and some gifts didn’t even get used.

The real meaning of the holidays is found in being with family and friends and enjoying our time together. So make your holiday memories count this year and here are some ideas to keep the season significant and worthwhile.

  One Gen Away food distribution

Serve or Give to Others in Need
Giving to people in need is really what Christmas is all about and it gives your children a wonderful example of what generosity is all about. I know of families who have given their Christmas budget to other families who are not as fortunate. We give to OneGenAway, the Nashville Rescue Mission, GraceWorks, Angel Tree, Samaritan’s Purse and as many as our budget will allow. We have sent Christmas boxes to the Military oversees who are keeping our nation safe. We have friends who serve every Holiday at soup kitchens to help our homeless, but receive more blessings than they give. What can you do this Holiday to make it special for those in need?

Angel Tree Donations

Useful Gifts that are Homemade
My friends and family have told me that some of the best presents they receive during the holiday are the basket of homemade goodies from us. I make jams, jellies, canned green beans and tomatoes, and sourdough bread and cinnamon rolls for them to eat over the holiday season. Sometimes, if I’m real industrious, I crochet or knit cotton dishcloths and scrubbies and include those too. The gifts are a piece of our sustainable life and very useful to the recipient. One of my favorite gifts every year is a bag of haystack cookies that our friend Linda gives us…it’s my favorite treat and I even freeze some of them to savor past the holiday.

Make and Decorate Christmas Cookies (or any special recipe) together
When my daughter Allison was little, her older cousin Carey would invite her over to bake and decorate Christmas sugar cookies with her every year in December. She would come home from that afternoon with all these tasty adorable decorated cookies that she could share with others. What a special memory that made for both of them and I’m sure Allison will continue that with her kids someday.

Play Games Together
Get off the video games and turn off the TV! A board or card game is fun and makes memories. Here is a site that has plenty of unique Christmas games to enjoy: https://www.pinterest.com/explore/christmas-party-games/?lp=true
Another fun game is to list the alphabet on a sheet of paper with lines next to each letter and guess holiday words that begin with each letter. Give each person or team 5 minutes to complete it. The winner is the person or team who has the MOST AND BEST answers. You will be surprised by the hilarious answers!

White Elephant Gifts
A white elephant gift exchange[1] or Yankee swap[2] is a party game where white elephant gifts are exchanged during festivities. The goal of a white elephant party is usually to entertain rather than to gain. Each participant supplies one wrapped gift. The gifts are placed in a central location, and participants determine in which order they will take turns selecting them. The first person opens a wrapped gift, and the turn ends. On subsequent turns, each person has the choice to either unwrap a new present or to “steal” another’s. When a person’s gift is stolen, that person can either choose another wrapped gift to open or can steal from another player. To avoid never ending circles, each gift can only be stolen once per turn. The game is over when everyone has a present. Generally, it is recommended to have at least six participants for the gift exchange party. With a larger group, game play may be more protracted. (source Wikipedia)

The white elephant gift should be something that you did not buy or something very inexpensive. An appropriate gift is something that you already have that you don’t want…the crazier, the better. One year I wrapped up a James Dean plastic mug set that I won at another White Elephant Exchange and I received an Ear Wax Candle Kit. The more laughs, the more fun you have!

Drawing Names for Gifts
Why give a gift to everyone in your entire extended family? Drawing names and concentrating on that one person to get them a special, meaningful gift can be a great way to celebrate the holiday. There is a more room in the budget when you only have to buy for one cousin…and not 10 of them.

Christmas Letter instead of a Card
I started sending a Christmas Letter each year instead of cards, so we could share information and updates about the family to extended members and friends who we don’t see on a weekly or monthly basis. A one page letter is sufficient, since most people won’t read more than that. I either use Christmas bordered paper or I create a letter and print it myself. It gives a personal touch and you can include photos of the kids and fur babies.

Christmas/Holiday Movies
Every year we watch several of our favorite Christmas movies together like ‘Its a Wonderful Life’, ‘Miracle on 34th Street’, ‘Christmas Vacation” …to name a few. Of course the Hallmark Channel has wonderful (sappy) movies that get you in the Christmas Spirit too. Watching as a family or in a group of friends, making popcorn and enjoying more home made goodies makes our holidays very memorable.

We hope you have a wonderful Christmas, Happy New Year, and enjoy a Sustainable Holiday that emphasizes memories and joy…the real Spirit of Christmas!
Leigh and Olin





Learn How To Live a Simple, Sustainable Life

What the purpose of the Sustainable Living Farm Conference?

To show people how to live with Less Stress and More Joy.  Freedom from the “rat race” can be achieved by learning the benefits of sustainable living, growing your own healthy food,
and creating a simpler life while saving thousand$. 

The 2017 Sustainable Farm Conference will include topics on:
sustainable housing
sources of farm income
growing natural, healthy food (without pesticides)
preserving and fermenting food
farm animals (their purpose)
helping pollinators and beneficial insects thrive on your farm
composting and soil testing
marketing your farm
agricultural green belt
networking opportunities
working with a debt free operation
temporary greenhouse production

The Funderburk’s have spent 12 years developing their dream, a small sustainable farm, that produces six different income streams. Their mission revolves around teaching individuals and families to grow their own healthy food, by renting garden plots and offering a summer U-Pick Garden to the community. They also host Educational Seminars, farm tours, and have a venue for local events/parties.

Formerly in corporate sales for a multimillion dollar company, Leigh spends her days managing their 15 acre farm in beautiful Franklin, TN. Olin has been in the construction business for over 30+ years and working toward his eventual retirement.

The One Day Conference schedule is as follows:
9:30 am – arrival and introductions
10:00 am to 12 noon – farm tour with exhibits on greenhouse/garden production, and farm animals
12:00 noon to 1:00 pm – Farm to Table Lunch and networking
1:00 to 2:30 pm – income sources and marketing your dream
2:30 to 4 pm – booth round table discussions on bees, herbs, farm equipment and more

In addition to the conference, each attendee/couple will receive a  free copy of “Dirt Rich“, the Funderburk’s  book on Sustainable Farm Living, and a free download of their online course “Dirt Rich, Sustainable Farm Living“.  

Cost $97 per person or $147 per couple which includes lunch and all conference materials. Call/text 615-591-0015 or e-mail stoneycreekfarmtennessee@gmail.com for more information.

To register, choose individual or couple and click the “add to cart” button below:

Individual or couple



How to Plant Seeds for the Garden

It’s not rocket science, but you do have to follow the directions on the seed packet…for instance: Depth to sow = 1/2″  which means to put the seed about a half an inch under the top of the soil.  The easiest way to make sure you are getting the correct depth is to use a ruler the first few times you plant the seeds.  Place the seed on top of the soil and use the top of the ruler to push it down into the soil to the correct depth.

In general, you will find that the larger the seed is, the deeper it will go in the soil and the smaller the seed is, the reverse is true.  Herb seeds are famous for being extremely small and most of the time, I sow them by sprinkling the tiny seeds on top of the soil and then watering them.  The seeds are so tiny that they will settle into the soil from watering.  If a seed is sown too deep, it may not germinate properly and then deteriorate before it has a chance to thrive above ground.

Seeds will need somewhere between 65-80 degrees temperature to germinate (depending on the seed), so starting them indoors near a window sill will work.  We build a temporary greenhouse each year that house hundreds of plants for our U-Pick Garden until the April 15th (last) frost date and then we transplant them into the ground. In the picture below we have over 1,000 seeds planted just on the left hand side of the greenhouse.  The green trays have 108 cells and the black trays have 72 cells.  We planted 5 varieties of tomatoes, broccoli, cabbage, and marigolds.  On the other side of the greenhouse (not pictured) are peppers and many varieties of herbs. Special thanks go to our volunteer interns Sarah Cho and Kendall Pinkston for all their help this week!!!

Plants need three things to survive:  nutrient rich soil, water and air.  Using a good potting soil will get your seeds off to a good start.  I like to use very small cells to plant my seeds and then transplant to larger containers  after they have germinated and grow to about 1-2 inches tall (depending on the plant).

You want to keep your cells/trays moist but not wet and let them dry out in between.  If your soil is too moist it can create mildew and mold which is a terrible environment for your new plants.  If your soil is too dry, your seeds will not germinate…a fine line indeed!

Here are Broccoli seedlings that have  popped up after 3 days.  Seeds have different germination times, so check your packet for all the info.

Olin and Alaina Knott (MTSU Intern) after they built our temporary greenhouse this year.  We reuse materials for several years which saves on cost.

Happy Planting!


    The Chicken, or the Egg?

    Deciding the answer to this question is the critical first step, before you actually get the chicks. Consider whether you really want to raise meat birds. They’re very different from egg-laying hens. You’ll have a lot (usually 50 or more, although you could just raise a few) of fast-growing birds, which means a lot of poop. And perhaps the biggest question to answer is: can you handle saying goodbye in a relatively short time? Whether you slaughter them on-farm or take them to be processed, if you’re a new farmer, you will need to face this reality, or be a vegetarian farmer. It’s up to you, but don’t agonize it after the fact: it’s considered cruel to let meat birds live longer than a few months as they are heavy-breasted and can die of heart failure if they grow too big.

    Some breeds can be used either for meat or for egg production. Assuming that you aren’t looking to invest in a huge broiler facility, our discussion on chickens will focus mostly around how to produce fresh eggs. You may or may not want to use the chickens for meat once their laying cycle is done, but by then they are literally not spring chickens anymore, and not as tender as they might be, so you’d want to think about this too, before slaughtering your previous egg layers for meat consumption.

    Should you get a rooster?

    Contrary to popular misconception, you don’t need a rooster for your hens to lay eggs. A rooster is needed to fertilize the eggs, to hatch them into baby chicks, but hens will lay just as many eggs whether there’s a rooster around or not. Some farmers would rather keep an all-female flock, and urban or suburban homesteaders may not have a choice, due to zoning laws that forbid roosters.

    When you keep a rooster, you have to be careful about broody hens (who will sit on the eggs, hoping they will hatch), because the eggs will start developing into baby chicks if fertilized. You can use the broody hen to hatch eggs, but this involves some decision making and supervision, so that the eggs you eat aren’t the ones she’s sitting on.

    Some farmers prefer to have a rooster, because he does offer significant protection for the flock. He will guard against predators and sound the alert if there is any perceived danger. We prefer to have a rooster because we think the girls get along better… but that is personal preference.

    rooster 3

    Pros of Having a Rooster:

    Roosters will protect their hens from predators, keeping them safe by keeping them together and sounding the alert if a predator approaches. He will also defend them bodily against an attacker!  They also complete the natural order of the flock. Chickens naturally live with males and females mixed, so you’re allowing your hens to live as “normal” a life as possible with a rooster in the mix. And owners have reported that roosters will break up “hen fights,” (think cat fights with feathers), find and give treats to their girls, encourage egg-laying, and even monitor the nest boxes.

    Roosters are iconic farmyard animals, and they are gorgeous to look at in many cases. They also have a lot of personality (think of the terms “cock of the walk, “ or “cock-a-hoop”). Many folks find that roosters are very entertaining and interesting creatures to have around.

    rooster 2

    You will need one if you want to naturally hatch baby chicks. My granddaddy Parker raised natural flocks, and the roosters were good daddies to their babies and took care of the mother hen too.

    Cons of Having a Rooster:

    One of the biggest cons of having a rooster is that his presence may violate your local zoning laws.  obviously, if your city or county doesn’t allow them, don’t get a rooster! You’re just asking for trouble.

    Even if your local laws don’t prohibit them, remember they can be noisy. Yes, they do crow, and yes, in the morning, and yes, at other inopportune times as well. Think of how you will like this when it happens, and also about your neighbors’ reactions, especially if you live in close quarters.

    Roosters can also be aggressive. They have spurs on their ankles that can break skin. You need to stay on top of “training” them that you’re the BIG rooster, so they respect you, and you might want to think about it if you have small children or lots of farm visitors.


    They can “wear out” hens. Mating between a rooster and a hen is, of course, a natural process, but if you have too many roosters and too few hens (one rooster can “take care of” up to 30 hens), your hens will start to show the wear: (backs rubbed clean of feathers, for example), they’ll be just plain worn out. So keep your rooster to hen ratio in the healthy zone!

    Next week…fun facts about breeding hens

    Disclaimer:  We are not experts in the farm animal field.  We are providing some general information on farm animals, but you should always check with your local veterinarian prior to administration of any medical treatment (topical or oral) for your farm animals.
    What would a farm be without its animals?  Even though we have a plant-based operation as the draw to our farm, we do raise chickens (and will try to reintroduce more goats, eventually, as well).

    But your passion may require you to raise certain type of animals on your farm, and hopefully this information  will help to guide you in those decisions.

    So here are some of the animals that we know a little about.  Again, it’s by no means an exhaustive list, but hopefully enough information to begin with:

    Dog Breeds for the Farm

    When having dogs on a farm, it’s important to know whether you want them as working dogs or pets.  Try not to mix these roles, as they will get confused.  Consider taking a training class on how to train a dog, and go through it with yours. You need to be the alpha, and have the bond with you.

    Breeds good for farm:

    1) Great Pyrenees: (the nannying dogs) Guard livestock, from pretty much anything (wolves to people). Pretty shy possibly even with owners possibly, ensure they are working dogs and not the pet. Big and woolly but do not shed very much. Can adjust to almost any temp and climate.  Good with all livestock. Love other animals (except for threats). Raised as herding and guarding dogs. Easy to take care of, very popular breed for farm work. Check out this video…

    2) Border Collie: More like a herding and gathering dog.  Very intelligent and energetic, so they need to be worked, otherwise they can get into mischief, need to be kept challenged. Very loyal, love to please.

    3) German Shepherd: Mostly thought of as canine/FBI dogs, but actually raised as a shepherd (hence the name). These dogs are very good at guarding, not really herding type, but very good at keeping everyone safe on the farm. Can be territorial and very protective, so need to train them young on how to act to strangers. Can be very loyal and sweet as well.

    4) Corgi: Don’t let their size fool you! Bred to snap at cattle heels and herd them, not at all afraid of larger animals. Because of general domestication of breed, which now has even shorter legs, probably better for small ruminants and perhaps chickens. Corgis are very smart as well.

    5) Rottweiler: Not many people remember that these were actually bred as guarding, territorial animals since Roman times. Great nannying dogs, like Great P’s, but are very territorial and they need to be introduced to strangers slowly, and you need to be there, otherwise they may, probably not attack, but display their territorial nature, so Rottweilers while great at what they do, and potentially very gentle and loving, because of the “Cujo” mystique many people are hesitant to use them.

    6) Australian Cattle Dog: Another really smart herding breed, not so much a guarding breed to scare predators away. Will keep livestock together and on the property. Very fast and nimble, typically only about 30-40 lbs. max.  Very fast and smart, another breed that you need to keep engaged.  In fact many of these breeds that can be used with effect on the farm do not do so well in urban settings/apartments, etc. and will tear stuff up because it is difficult to keep them active enough and their minds engaged enough. Really need to wear them out.

    7) English Sheep Dog, bred to care for sheep, one of the oldest and well-known herding dogs. Also one of the most successful farm helpers due to their strength and agility, will stand up to almost any predator, but also a very sweet temperament and loving. Have a thick coat, but this is breathable, so they don’t get super-hot and can do well in hot summers.  Do not require a whole lot of coat management.  Will get shaggy if outdoors a lot, but a trim at a vet’s office once or twice a year should be enough to deal with this, and won’t cost you much.

    Should you let your working dogs sleep inside? Depends on what you are working with, if you are keeping them mostly as herding animals and you confine your herd at night and don’t need dogs to protect against predators, then they can go in garage, for example. But if your livestock is going to be exposed to coyotes, hawks, etc., then you’ll want your dogs to be around, so that you (and your herd) will feel more secure.

    8) Burmese Mountain Dog: Very similar to the Great Pyrenees. Bred mainly for guarding, very attentive to what they do, but perhaps not as agile as some other dogs. Can get very big (100+ lbs.)

    Standard care for dogs:  Core vaccines as per state regs.  1 or 3-year rabies shots, distemper/parvovirus (1 or 3 year). Not state mandated in TN, but a very common one that protects against contagious diseases (especially as puppies)

    Situational vaccines: Bordatella (for kennel cough) Lyme Disease and influenza.  We don’t usually give Lyme Disease in TN, as the tick vector is not found in this state.

    Also need protection against internal and external parasites like fleas and ticks, heartworm (this is a mosquito-borne parasite and now a big problem in TN, especially since Katrina, when a lot of animals in Louisiana who routinely were exposed, then fostered up in Tennessee, and then mosquitoes spread it everywhere).

    Need to check at least annually, because dog can be on a great prevention (Trifexis). Expensive, but if you document administration and dog contracts heartworm they will pay for it.  Heartguard is also great.  Differs from Trifexis in that it does heartworms and roundworms) Trifexis does heartworms, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, and fleas (not ticks). You can do Trifexis and a supplemental flea and tick protection, and the extra flea prevention will not be a problem as it will be a completely different mode of action.

    Sometimes, dog medicines, like people medicines, will have different names, but it’s the same medicine just made by a different manufacturer. But in the case of Advantage multi, for instance, this is very different from Trifexis and Heartgard.  Advantage is a topical, so when applied to the skin, it goes into the blood, so when a flea or tick bites, its going to be killed automatically.  The Trifexis actually goes into the subcutaneous layers of the skin after the dog has ingested it, and this prevents the fleas from even wanting to bite (a repellent, that is).

    Any of the ingestion methods are going to be completely different in mode of action from any of your topicals, although much of the time the end result (killing of adult fleas, replant action, etc.) can be the same.

    Getting animals spayed or neutered can not only prevent unwanted pregnancy, but can also prevent against certain sex-linked cancers. Studies are showing that animals spayed before three years can reduce the chance of ovarian and uterine cancers, and (if neutered) prostate and testicular cancers.

    Vets always recommend spaying/neutering unless you know you would like to breed the animal (which can be another source of farm income, BTW) 6 months or older.

    On the diet front…raw meat is not a good thing for your dog. Parasites etc. that are removed by cooking are in the meat, which has also been raised in a no-wild state can infect your dogs.

    Animals, like people, are living so much longer now, largely due to better care, that the end result of most dog lives is now some form of cancer (as it is in people).  So cancer-preventive measures are a good idea. However, cancer treatments in animals, as in people, have also made great strides, which is something to consider perhaps in a younger dog especially.

    Next week…more farm animals and their care.

    To learn more about sustainable farming check out our “Simple Sustainable Farm Living” Conference:

    “How I Fell in Love with our Farm”

    OK, I have to admit that I fell in love with the place immediately. A creek with a stone bed winds almost through the entire farm, and lends its identity to the name of our property: Stoney Creek Farm. In the spring we have about a quarter acre of yellow daffodils (otherwise known as buttercups) growing all around the creek.  In the summer the native Yucca plants bloom a field of white.  We are abundantly rich with native wildlife, trees and plants and it’s a beautiful and peaceful place to live.


    Our residence is actually a pole barn design, complete with steel beams and stained concrete floor, finished inside as a house. Olin has always enjoyed repurposing and recycling materials, and this barn/house was the perfect experiment for him. One of our biggest conversation pieces is the pair of 100-year-old barn doors lining the dining room wall. He also built two full 12’x60′ porches on the front and back of the barn for more outdoor living space, and a three car garage on the end of the barn with lots of room for a freezer, extra refrigerator and storage.  Later, Olin finished the upstairs hayloft into a large bonus room bedroom and third full bathroom in the barn.

    barn picture for ads

    This hybrid barn/house has proven to be comfortable, simple, and very sustainable. By building a pole barn with metal there is very little maintenance for at least 30 years. The only maintenance is replacement of the screws that hold the metal every 10 years.

    The concrete floors are also very easy to maintain and keep clean. Olin also built a smaller barn and workshop with two more garage bays and horse stalls in the back. We determined that it was too much work and too much money for us to maintain our own horses, but sometime in the future we may be able to board horses as another source of income, so I’m glad we have the stalls.

    We’ve experimented unsuccessfully with small fruit orchards (cedar rust and thieving raccoons) and meat goats (coyotes), but we still have a few goats for kids to pet when they come to visit, and may decide to breed again one day.

    Goat and Olin

    After these learning experiences, in 2011 we decided to offer rental gardens and a U-Pick Garden. In Williamson County there is a huge amount of people living in apartments, condos, and homes with small lots. We felt that many of these people would like to grow their own healthy food, and with our backgrounds in farming we were hoping that we could help them do so.
    garden best

    Our goal does not revolve solely around making money, it’s about helping people to see the benefits of sustainable farm living… benefits which I call less stress, more joy.  As a former part of the rat race, I know the value of healthy living with lower stress, because my blood pressure went down almost immediately when I left Xerox to concentrate full-time on growing our sustainable farm model.


    The farm has been full of surprises, allowing me to stretch my interests and create opportunities to teach those things no longer taught in schools, or even passed down in family traditions, things like Canning, Making Sourdough Bread, and much more. I have also taken painting classes and now sell paintings and teach painting (occasionally) at the farm. All these things simply bring us a great deal of joy, and we want to share our joy with you, whether you want to learn how you also can permanently get out of the corporate rat race, or just need a break from it on the weekend.


    So stop by and see us, and see your kids laugh as they play with our silly goats, miles away from the nearest video game. Feel your body relax as you walk among the flowers and pick your own vegetables outside in the fresh air, and not under fluorescent lights while freezing to death in the air-conditioned maze of some anonymous big box store.  Maybe even take your shoes off, and dig your feet into the dirt wealth that nourishes so many people, on so many levels. Whatever the reason for the city scowl you might arrive with, you’ll have a country smile by the time you leave.